Month: February 2021

This article may include advertisements, paid product features, affiliate links and other forms of sponsorship. Let’s face it. Parenting isn’t easy. Parenting without raising your voice seems even LESS easy. Don’t worry, we aren’t going to leave you hanging. Here are 8 simple and easy ways to get your child’s attention without raising your voice
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Molecules called microRNAs (miRNAs) that are measurable in urine have been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai as predictors of both heart and kidney health in children without disease. The epidemiological study of Mexican children was published in February in the journal Epigenomics. For the first time, we measured in healthy children the associations between
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Norovirus is a virus that spreads through contaminated food and water, leading to severe gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting (1). The virus is known by several names, such as stomach bug, vomiting bug, or winter vomiting bug. The norovirus infection is commonly referred to as food poisoning or stomach
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Experts tout the benefits of making art for child development, but parents know the uncontrollable quantity of art kids are capable of creating. The funny moms and dads of Twitter often share their attempts to interpret their kids’ drawings, approaches to disposing of excess doodles, honest reviews and more. Below, we’ve rounded up 55 relatable
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Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Nulibry (fosdenopterin) for injection to reduce the risk of death due to Molybdenum Cofactor Deficiency Type A, a rare, genetic,  metabolic disorder that typically presents in the first few days of life, causing intractable seizures, brain injury and death. Today’s action marks the first FDA approval for
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Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants with moderate to large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) may benefit from transcatheter PDA closure (TCPC) in the first four weeks of life, according to research published by Le Bonheur Cardiologist Ranjit Philip, MD, and Medical Director of Interventional Cardiac Imaging and Interventional Catheterization Laboratory Shyam Sathanandam, MD. Early PDA
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE You might have heard about the importance of breastfeeding from others, but only you can experience the true beauty of it when your baby latches onto your breast and starts to suckle. Breastfeeding is one of the most significant and emotional events of motherhood. It nourishes the baby and helps
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While the amazing regenerative power of the liver has been known since ancient times, the cells responsible for maintaining and replenishing the liver have remained a mystery. Now, research from the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) has identified the cells responsible for liver maintenance and regeneration while also pinpointing where they
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Puberty looks different, in terms of both reproductive hormones and breast maturation, in girls with excess total body fat, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Previous studies found that girls with obesity start puberty and experience their first menstrual period earlier than girls with normal
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Let’s be honest. Kids are kids. They get into things, get sick, and then they get better. After going through this routine over and over parents learn to not sweat the small stuff and relax as they become more experienced with nursing their children through ailments. We never really think to ask ourselves if we
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE The World Health Organization (WHO) defines chiropractic as “a healthcare profession concerned with diagnosing, treating, and preventing disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on general health (1).” Chiropractic works on the premise that the human body is a neuromusculoskeletal system, and any disorder in one
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Scientists at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified the specialized environment, known as a niche, in the bone marrow where new bone and immune cells are produced. The study, published in Nature, also shows that movement-induced stimulation is required for the maintenance of this niche, as well as the
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